Indie Game


Indie Game: Mini Film Commentary


Tonight I watched the film “Indie Game” for the first time. It was a really interesting look into the Indie game development scene. It was also a narrow viewpoint that left a lot of things out, favoring emo storytelling.

Was it effective? Yes, especially the family angle. I was shocked that Microsoft was charging tens of thousands of dollars to upload a patch for your Indie game. That seems like greed to me. Wouldn’t it be in Microsoft’s best interest to give their XBOX players the best game experience?

The times might have changed or be changing on that issue, thanks in part to pressure from Sony. I’m not going to research. The kitty is not so hardcore.

I really liked the comment that video games are like all of the world’s greatest art forms rolled into one medium, and then making that medium interactive. There is “nothing better than that”, except it’s still about getting the girl in the end, so it sort of begs the question: maybe girls are better than video games.

It was good to see this film cover just these guys from various locations working out of their parents’ houses to make a game. I’ve always admired programmers. I started programming at the age of 12, and I wasn’t good enough. I went to a bad college with a horrible computer science program, which supports the idea of not going to college if you want to program.

I’ll be studying Javascript this fall at a community college, which is worse.

I don’t “get things” like normal people. I need my hand held, and then I can get it. This is why I write guides. I guess geniuses just know these things and don’t need guides to them.

If you’re a genius but you don’t get it either, maybe you could email Tommy Refenes, co-author of “Super Meat Boy” and ask him how to learn to program games without going to college. I noticed some good threads in the Steam forums on this topic, which is somehow apropos.

Super Meat Boy was the most interesting of the three Indie games the film followed. It looks like a cross between Super Mario and the movie Saw. The damsel in distress cliche is ameliorated by the “meat and bandage” metaphor of the hero and the heroine he is trying to save (“bandage girl“).

I really like that theme. A lot of guys are wounded and in pain for various reasons, and even the programmer of the game apparently suffers from diabetes. There is nothing wrong with the MMO cliche of girls being healers. The world needs healers to combat torture porn games.

Disclaimer: I always play a healer, so I might be biased. Observation: all the Indie games featured in this film have a male protagonist.

So if you haven’t seen this film, here is a recommendation. All of these guys are amazing, and bras off to their geek godliness. If there are other documentaries out there that are more meaty and industry-revealing, I would love to hear about them.

I read gaming news every day, but aside from the more brainiac MMORPG columns, I’m probably reading the wrong things. I want to know when betas are starting and things are releasing, like Skullgirls for PC. That answer is August 22. I’m not much a fighter aficionado, but I’ve watched enough video clips to know that I’ll buy at some point.


Rift Woes Over


As a final note, I solved my problem with Rift lag mentioned in my last post. I re-installed the game off my SSD onto my HD. The lag was gone as fast as chocolate ice cream in our freezer.

I still haven’t diagnosed my SSD with a problem in itself, but I can’t expect the Rift devs to account for me running two copies of Rift at the same time off the same installation, so I’m not blaming them. (I had lag regardless of one or two games running.)

I’m running my second account off my old computer now networked instead, and the Eth girls are boxing together again. I also installed an RP addon and wrote some backstories for my characters this last week. Rift is going swimmingly.

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About Silverangel

https://kittykittyboomboom.wordpress.com/ View all posts by Silverangel

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